Romney (and Santorum) Offer NO APOLOGY to Single Mothers

In the wake of the Rush Limbaugh “slut”-bashing comment, the media was highlighting Rick Santorum’s previous comments about single mothers.

“We are seeing the fabric of this country fall apart, and it’s falling apart because of single moms.”
“What we have is moms raising children in single-parent households simply breeding more criminals”
as Santorum explained his concern over the welfare system. “Open up the current periodicals—study after study, article after article, children having children is destroying the fabric of our country,” Santorum said. “If you want to close your eyes to it, if you don’t care about it, if you don’t want to solve it, if you want to continue the system, to let people stay and spiral—go ahead. Not with me.” Single mothers, Santorum argued, needed politicians who weren’t afraid of “kicking them in the butt.”

Voters who may be looking for an alternative to potential Commander-in-Chief Santorum may have wondered about Mitt Romney. For that, simply turn to his book, NO APOLOGY : The Case for American Greatness

I believe it’s time for Americans to be honest with ourselves,” Romney writes in a discussion on the role of Education in America. “We will never be able to truly address the achievement gap until we eliminate the high rate of out-of-wedlock births in our country. It’s not a coincidence that student achievement scores by ethnicity mirror the rates of out-of-wedlock births.”
“We must engage in a national campaign much like the one waged against smoking beginning in the 1960’s and against drunk driving in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Kids must be taught in school about the advantages of marriage. Welfare and safety-net programs must be reshaped to ensure that they do not facilitate or encourage out-of-wedlock births.”

“given the enormous human and national implications of nearly half our children being raised without the benefit of two parents, it is long past time to tell the truth : a marriage between one man and one woman is one of the best things a parent can do for a child.”

These thoughts tell a lot about the man that would have veto power over all government funding … as well as the discretionary authority to dictate healthcare policy … and it was just Tuesday, in Kirkwood Missouri that potential-CEO-in-Chief Romney spoke of government funding that he would cut: “Planned Parenthood, we’re going to get rid of that.”

Romney’s comments need to be considered in the context of a passage in the book, The Real Romney, by Scott Helman and Michael Kranish and the story of Peggie Hayes.

Peggie Hayes had joined the church as a teenager along with her mother and siblings. They’d had a difficult life. Mormonism offered the serenity and stability her mother craved. “It was,” Hayes said, “the answer to everything.” Her family, though poorer than many of the well-off members, felt accepted within the faith. Everyone was so nice. The church provided emotional and, at times, financial support. As a teenager, Hayes babysat for Mitt and Ann Romney and other couples in the ward. Then Hayes’s mother abruptly moved the family to Salt Lake City for Hayes’s senior year of high school. Restless and unhappy, Hayes moved to Los Angeles once she turned 18. She got married, had a daughter, and then got divorced shortly after. But she remained part of the church.
By 1983, Hayes was 23 and back in the Boston area, raising a 3-year-old daughter on her own and working as a nurse’s aide. Then she got pregnant again. Single motherhood was no picnic, but Hayes said she had wanted a second child and wasn’t upset at the news. “I kind of felt like I could do it,” she said. “And I wanted to.” By that point Mitt Romney, the man whose kids Hayes used to watch, was, as bishop of her ward, her church leader. But it didn’t feel so formal at first. She earned some money while she was pregnant organizing the Romneys’ basement. The Romneys also arranged for her to do odd jobs for other church members, who knew she needed the cash. “Mitt was really good to us. He did a lot for us,” Hayes said. Then Romney called Hayes one winter day and said he wanted to come over and talk. He arrived at her apartment in Somerville, a dense, largely working-class city just north of Boston. They chitchatted for a few minutes. Then Romney said something about the church’s adoption agency. Hayes initially thought she must have misunderstood. But Romney’s intent became apparent: he was urging her to give up her soon-to-be-born son for adoption, saying that was what the church wanted. Indeed, the church encourages adoption in cases where “a successful marriage is unlikely.”
Hayes was deeply insulted. She told him she would never surrender her child. Sure, her life wasn’t exactly the picture of Rockwellian harmony, but she felt she was on a path to stability. In that moment, she also felt intimidated. Here was Romney, who held great power as her church leader and was the head of a wealthy, prominent Belmont family, sitting in her gritty apartment making grave demands. “And then he says, ‘Well, this is what the church wants you to do, and if you don’t, then you could be excommunicated for failing to follow the leadership of the church,’ ” Hayes recalled. It was a serious threat. At that point Hayes still valued her place within the Mormon Church. “This is not playing around,” she said. “This is not like ‘You don’t get to take Communion.’ This is like ‘You will not be saved. You will never see the face of God.’ ” Romney would later deny that he had threatened Hayes with excommunication, but Hayes said his message was crystal clear: “Give up your son or give up your God.”
Not long after, Hayes gave birth to a son. She named him Dane.

Dane is now a 27-year-old electrician in Salt Lake City … who knows what his future may hold … heck, today it is not uncommon for a child predominately raised by a single Mother to become President of the United States …

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